Already a Pilot

You’ve done all the hard work, passed your Private Pilot check ride and now it’s time to sit back and relax.

Most pilots will disagree with that statement. As the old pilot saying goes, getting your Pilot’s License is only a license to learn. Paragon is committed to continuously helping pilots further their knowledge and skills to ensure they fly safe, stay current and have fun.

We have many pilot training programs to help you reach your maximum potential as a pilot. Below is a short list of the most common training programs that can be completed in your own aircraft or ours. If you don’t see what you are looking for, just ask and we will do everything possible to help.

Just like our primary pilot training programs all of our more advanced curriculums are custom designed to fit your unique goals and needs as a pilot.

Biannual Flight Review

These flight reviews are mandatory by the FAA and must be conducted at least every 24 calendar months. The reason for the review is simple; keep pilots safe by continuously reviewing rules and refreshing their skills in the air.

Although the FAA requires this review, we see it as a bare minimum. We recommend flying at least every 90 days and suggest joining a continuous training program like the FAA Wings.

Click here to learn more about FAA Wings

BFR Requirements (SEL Aircraft)

  1. Required at least every 24 calendar months.
  2. Consist of two parts – Ground Review & Flight Review.
  3. FAA requires a minimum of 1 hour on the ground and 1 hour in the air.
  4. Normally takes about 2-3 hours total.
  5. Your plane or our plane, either will work for us.
  6. Cost is usually $200-$300 USD

Instrument Rating

The instrument rating is usually the next step after you complete your private pilot certificate. Because weather is unpredictable, it is almost essential to have an instrument rating if you plan to fly long distances or cross-country. As a private pilot, you are restricted to flying under VFR rules (looking out the windows) and therefore are limited when you can fly. An instrument pilot is able to fly in less than perfect weather and through clouds using the aircraft’s precision guidance instrumentation.

Our instrument training curriculum is FAA Part 141 approved. This means it has met the highest training standards designated by the Federal Aviation Administration. Our program also allows our students to enjoy a much more structured training syllabus that requires fewer hours to complete.

Steps for Becoming an Instrument Rated Pilot

  1. Hold a private pilot certificate
  2. Have a valid 3rd Class Medical
  3. Must be 17 years old
  4. You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  5. Completed and logged the FAA approved ground and flight training for the instrument rating.
  6. 35 hours of flight training
  7. Pass the FAA Instrument Rating written exam
  8. Pass the Instrument Rating Oral and Practical Exam

Since there are no minimum flight hours required to qualify for the FAA exam, you must demonstrate the ability to operate the aircraft to FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS). This is generally obtained in 8-15 hours of ground and flight training.

We have the most advanced twin-engine training aircraft in the world, the Tecnam P2006T with the Garmin G950 avionics package. Using advanced composite building materials and equipped with the lightweight but powerful Rotax engines, this aircraft burns only 10 gallons of fuel per hour. Most twin-engine aircraft burn anywhere from 20-30 gallons per hour. Less fuel burn translates to you spending less money on training.

All of our multi engine courses are specifically designed for Technically Advanced Aircraft (TAA). Our multi engine aircraft are designated TAA and feature the Garmin G950 “glass cockpit” avionics package. By training in a TAA you are ensured to get the most advanced flight training available.

 

Multi Engine Training

Adding a multi engine rating to your existing private pilot or commercial certificate is a very simple process. Larger planes generally have two engines, can fly longer distances and carry more passengers. More capability makes twin engine rating the next step in your progression as a pilot.

Steps For Becoming a Multi Engine Pilot

  1. Hold a valid private pilot certificate or commercial rating
  2. Have a valid 3rd Class Medical
  3. Must be 17 years old
  4. You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  5. Completed and logged the appropriate ground and flight training for the multi engine rating.
  6. Operate the aircraft to FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS)
  7. Pass the FAA Oral and Practical Exam
  8. No minimum flight hours required

Since there are no minimum flight hours required to qualify for the FAA exam, you must demonstrate the ability to operate the aircraft to FAA Practical Test Standards (PTS). This is generally obtained in 8-15 hours of ground and flight training.

We have the most advanced twin-engine training aircraft in the world, the Tecnam P2006T with the Garmin G950™ avionics package.  Using advanced composite building materials and equipped with the lightweight but powerful Rotax engines, this aircraft burns only 10 gallons of fuel per hour. Most twin-engine aircraft burn anywhere from 20-30 gallons per hour. Less fuel burn translates to you spending less money on training.

All of our multi engine courses are specifically designed for Technically Advanced Aircraft (TAA). Our multi engine aircraft are designated TAA and feature the Garmin G950™ “glass cockpit” avionics package. By training in a TAA, you are ensured to get the most advanced flight training available.

Commercial Pilot Training

Want to be paid to fly? Commercial pilots can act as the pilot in command of an aircraft that is carrying passengers or property and be paid for it. Usually, professional pilots begin their careers by performing sightseeing flights, towing banners, patrolling pipelines, dropping off skydivers or by becoming a Certified Flight Instructor. With as little as 250 hours total flying time you can qualify to become a commercial pilot.

Steps for Becoming a Commercial Pilot

  1. Hold a valid private pilot certificate
  2. Hold a valid 2nd Class Medical
  3. Must be 18 years old
  4. You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  5. Instrument Rating – Not required by law but 95% of employers will require it
  6. Completed and logged the appropriate ground and flight training for the commercial training.
  7. 100 hours pilot in command (PIC)
  8. 250 hours total logged flight time
  9. Pass the FAA Oral and Practical Exam
  10. Pass the FAA Written Exam

Our commercial pilot courses are custom designed to fit your unique goals and needs as a pilot. Our courses are also specifically designed for Technically Advanced Aircraft (TAA). By training in a TAA you are ensured to get the most advanced flight training available.